ESA Contact Number

0843 320 9134

ESA contact number
ESA contact number

ESA, or Employment and Support Allowance, is a UK welfare benefit which exists to give financial aid to people who can’t work or can’t find a job due to a long-term illness or disability, and to help them back to work. It came into force in 2008, replacing a triad of older benefits systems – incapacity benefit, income support (when it was paid due to an illness or disability) and severe disablement allowance. The primary difference between ESA and incapacity benefit is that ESA is considerably harder to receive.

Designed first by New Labour, then put into effect and expanded upon considerably by the Conservatives, ESA features a strict medical exam which has been criticised for its accuracy and for the way it is set up, with opponents claiming that it excludes huge amounts of people who genuinely need it.

 

ESA FAQs

Which day is ESA paid?
How do I claim ESA?
When is ESA paid?
What is ESA?

Why Would I Need To Call The ESA Telephone Number?

If you are applying for ESA, or you currently receive the benefits, or if you have a relative or dependent who relies on them, you may need to get in contact with the ESA contact number at any time. You may be calling to find out more information about these benefits, or to query why yours have been stopped or delayed. You may be calling to report a problem, to complain about service or experience while collecting benefits, or to arrange an appointment at the benefits office.

You may need to call the ESA helpline for any reason, including making inquiries and complaints. For example, you might want to call:

  • To apply for ESA
  • To enquire about ESA
  • To find out more information about whether you are eligible for ESA
  • To make an appeal after being rejected from the ESA medical test
  • To arrange an appointment at the benefits office
  • To make a complaint about service or benefits received
  • To enquire about careers with the Benefits Office

Other Useful ESA Phone Numbers

ESA Phone Number
Head Office 0843 320 9134
Security Advisory 0843 320 9134
Complaints 0843 320 9134

ESA Contact Phone Line Opening Hours

Department Opening Hours
Head Office 9am-5pm

ESA Head Office Postal Address

Department Location
Head Office ESA Head Office
The Pyramids Business Park
Livingston
EH54 8SF

ESA FAQs

How long is the ESA Assessment Phase?

The ESA Assessment Phase is supposed to last for 13 weeks, while your case is considered and your application is looked at from every angle. Although it is officially supposed to last for 13 weeks, for many claimants, it actually winds up lasting much, much longer. During the assessment phase, you will probably receive an ESA50 Limited Capability for Work Questionnaire, and will probably need to attend a medical to further assess your need for ESA and confirm your illness, injury or disability. At the end of the assessment phase, you will ideally receive a decision and be told whether you’ll be receiving ESA and, if you will be, which group you will be sorted into.

After that, if you are found incapable of work, you will be moved on into the main phase of ESA. At this point, you will be sorted into one of two groups – the work-related activity group and the support group. At this point you will receive more money, but will be subjected to regular reassessment to make sure you continue to qualify. If your crippling disability should suddenly become marginally less crippling, so that you could be qualified as “fit for work” under the Conservative medical review system, it would be a travesty for that to go unnoticed and for your money to keep coming in. Therefore, if the regular reassessments discover that you are no longer eligible, your benefits will stop immediately.

How do I claim ESA?

The fastest, easiest and least stressful way to apply for ESA is over the phone – simply call the ESA contact number on 0843 320 9134 between the hours of 9am and 5pm, any day of the week. You’ll be put through to the main ESA contact line headquarters, and from there can be transferred to the applications department. Once there, you’ll be asked for the following information:

  • National Insurance number
  • medical certificate
  • GP’s address and phone number
  • home and mobile telephone numbers
  • mortgage or landlord details
  • council tax bill
  • employer’s address and telephone number and dates of employment or last day worked
  • bank account details
  • details of any other money you are getting, such as benefits or sick pay

And will need to provide them in order to advance your benefits application, so make sure to have them handy when you’re making the call! Alternatively, if calling is inconvenient, impossible, or awkward, you can go online ot the official ESA website (this isn’t it) and print out the ESA1 form. Once you’ve got it, fill it out and bring it to your nearest Job Centre along with all the documents listed above, to begin your application.

When is ESA paid?

ESA is paid every week. Usually, after you’ve made your claim, you’ll be given the assessment rate while the claim is processed and the decision is made. This assessment rate is ordinarily:

  • up to £57.90 a week if you’re aged under 25
  • up to £73.10 a week if you’re aged 25 or over

After the decision is made, you will switch onto a different rate of benefits payment. If you are found to be ineligible, you may appeal the decision, and will receive nothing. If you are found to be eligible for ESA, you will be sorted into one of two groups (work related activity group and support group) and will receive:

  • up to £102.15 a week if you’re in the work-related activity group
  • up to £109.30 a week if you’re in the support group

If you are in the support group and are also separately on income-related benefits, you may also be entitled to an enhanced disability premium at £15.75 per week, or even, if your disability is severe enough, the severe disability premium, which pays out at £61.85 per week.

 

What is ESA?

ESA, or Employment and Support Allowance, is a UK welfare benefit which exists to give financial aid to people who can’t work or can’t find a job due to a long-term illness or disability, and to help them back to work. It came into force in 2008, replacing a triad of older benefits systems – incapacity benefit, income support (when it was paid due to an illness or disability) and severe disablement allowance. The primary difference between ESA and incapacity benefit is that ESA is considerably harder to receive.

Designed first by New Labour, then put into effect and expanded upon considerably by the Conservatives, ESA features a strict medical exam which has been criticised for its accuracy and for the way it is set up, with opponents claiming that it excludes huge amounts of people who genuinely need it.